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Statement On The Situation In The Frontier Province New Delhi : May 7, 1947

Quaid-e-Azam with  members of NWFP Assembly in Peshawar Quaid-i-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah, President of the All India Muslim League, issued a thousand words Statement on the Frontier. "I have had the opportunity of fully discussing with Frontier League leaders the situation in the North-West Frontier Province and the developments that have taken place recently. The League movement in the Frontier was started because the people and especially the Muslim Leaguers and the League organization in the Province were sought to be crushed by Khan Sahib Ministry, by fair means or foul, ever since the ministry was formed. The victimization, persecution, suppression and oppression on the part of the Government, knew no limits. “Every vestige of civil liberties had ceased to exist. Ordinances, Frontier Crimes Regulations, Section 144 and other repressive provisions of the law were being freely and ruthlessly used to deprive the people of their rights of political expression and criticism

Quaid-e-Azam with the Muslim League National Guards, Peshawar 1945

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The Quaid-e-Azam presenting the National Standard to a regiment, Peshawar 1948

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Quaid-e-Azam reviews a guard of honour at Peshawar

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Quaid-e-Azam M.A. Jinnah arriving at the Cunningham Gardens Peshawar on 20 April 1948

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Quaid-e-Azam in Peshawar, 1940

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Solidarity of Pakistan

The Historic Group Photograph of Quaid E Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah at his Last Visit to Islamia College, Peshawar, Pakistan (12.04.1948 CE) (Courtesy of Prof. Dr. Taskeen Ahmad Khan, Associate Dean, Associate Faculty of Urology, Khyber Medical University, Peshawar (nb: From the Personal Library File of Maj. Gen (Retd.) Anwar Sher Khan, Peshawar).   “Remember we are building up a State which is going to play its full part in the destinies of the whole Islamic World. We, therefore, need a wider look, an outlook which transcends the boundaries of provinces, limited nationalism, and racialism. We must develop a sense of patriotism which should galvanize us all into one united and strong nation. That is the only way in which we can achieve our goal, the goal of our struggle, the goal for which millions of Mussalmans have lost their lives.”   Islamia College, Peshawar, 12 April, 1948

Quaid-e-Azam's Visit to Peshawar in 1936

      The Historic Group Photograph of Quaid-e-Azam Mohammad Ali Jinnah at his Last Visit to Islamia College, Peshawar, N-WFP, Pakistan (12.04.1948 CE) (Courtesy of Prof. Dr. Taskeen Ahmad Khan, Associate Dean, Associate Faculty of Urology, Khyber Medical University, Peshawar (nb: From the Personal Library File of Maj. Gen (Retd.) Anwar Sher Khan, Peshawar). by Mohammad Anwar Khan The Government of India Act 1935, though considered “fundamentally bad”1 by the Muslim leaders, was a significant step, as the future constitutional framework of India was based upon it. Elections to the provincial assemblies were announced for the fall 1936-37 and the Muslim League in the 24th session, in Bombay, on the 12th of April 1936, resolved to contest the provincial assemblies elections and authorised the Quaid to organise elections boards at the central and the provincial level and also devise “ways and means” for contesting the forthcoming election.2 The Quaid, accordingly, invited a large number

Quaid-e-Azam lands in Peshawar, June 1948

followed by Ms Jinnah, Sir Ambrose Dundas Governor and Abdul Qayyum Khan Chief Minister of NWFP and Major General Nazir Ahmed

Constitutional position of Baluchistan (13th Jun 1948)

Reply to the Address presented by a Deputation of the members of the Quetta Parsi Community on 13th June, 1948.   Click to enlarge. Receiving a Karakuli Jinnah Cap from Balochistan National Guards Gentlemen, I am very pleased indeed to meet you all and have an opportunity of hearing your well-considered views about Baluchistan, and I have no doubt in your sincerity and loyalty to Pakistan. Your community is really very well organised and I am happy–and I always say so–that it is better equipped than any other community that I know of in the sub-continent. You, therefore, although small in number, can make very great contribution to the welfare and progress of Pakistan and particularly Baluchistan. Now coming nearer to Baluchistan, I know that people have not yet fully realised what present constitution is–that is true of even of well-informed and well-educated people. The establishment of Pakistan was catastrophic change and thus came so suddenly that people have not yet fully r

Be a Force of Peace: Advice to athletes (13th Jun 1948)

Speech at the Opening Ceremony of the First Pakistan Olympic Games at Karachi on 22nd April, 1948. Pir Illahi Baksh, Mr. Ahmed Jaffer, Members of the Organizing and other Committees, Ladies and Gentlemen: It has given me great pleasure to come here today to perform the opening ceremony of the first Pakistan Olympic games. I agreed to become the patron-in-chief of the Pakistan Olympic Association in the realisation that the success of our people in all walks of life depends upon the cultivation of “Sound Minds” the natural concomitant to “Sound Bodies”. To the athletes and youth of the nation I bid welcome. My message to you is: build up physical strength not for aggression, not for militarism, but for becoming fighting fit, all your life and all the time in every walk of life of your nation wherever you be and always to be a force for peace, international amity and goodwill. After these games you shall go to the World Olympic at Wembley Stadium, London, representing us as messenger

Pakistan and Afghanistan - Bound by age-old links (8th May 1948)

Reply to the Speech made by His Excellency the Ambassador of Afghanistan at the time of presenting Credentials on 8th May, 1948. Your Royal Highness, It gives me very great pleasure indeed to welcome you today as the first Ambassador from Afghanistan. The Government and people of Pakistan greatly appreciate the action of His Majesty the King of Afghanistan in sending to us an Ambassador from the Royal family of Afghanistan. We hope and trust that with a Representative of Your Royal Highness’ distinction and experience the age-old link which bind our two peoples will be further strengthened thus paving the way for a bright and happy future for both our countries. Your Royal Highness has rightly referred to the natural bonds of friendship and affection, which bind the people of our two countries. It could hardly be otherwise as these bonds are based on ties of faith and culture and common ideals. With such powerful bonds already in our favour we cannot, I feel, fail to bring the pe

The commercial policy of Pakistan (27th Apr 1948)

Reply to the Address presented by the Karachi Chamber of Commerce on 27th April 1948. It gives me great pleasure, Mr. Chairman, to be here this morning with you all at this you’re 88th Annual General Meeting. I presume it is an accident to hold this meeting in the premises of the Karachi Cotton Association, for one can hardly dissociate Karachi from commerce and the commerce of this place from cotton. You have, Mr. Chairman, covered a very wide field in your address, from the founding of the sovereign and independent State of Pakistan to the petty usurpations of power by minor official here and there over this far-flung Dominion, from the intricacies of cotton trade to the common place of delays. You will, however, hardly expect me to follow you in every detail in my reply. I cannot, however, let an opportunity, such as you have presented to me today, pass without calling attention to certain salient points arising out of your address. Let me, Mr. Chairman first acknowledge the tri

Educational progress of Frontier Province (18th Apr 1948)

Reply to the Address of Welcome Presented by the Principal, Staff and Students of the Edwards College, Peshawar on l8th April, 1948. Mr. Principal, Members of the Staff and my Student-friends, I am no stranger to this Institution. I came here, as your Address rightly records, in 1936. Well, perhaps many of you do not know what happened then, but, Mr. Principal, the sympathy and the kindness that your Institution showed me at that time, I shall always remember. I was, to put it one word, literally dismissed from this Province in 1937. But that did not dishearten me, I came again, I believe, in 1945 or 1946 during the time of the last election. I found then that there was a great change, but, unfortunately, on that occasion also we were defeated. I do not like to remind you of unpleasant things. My young friends, ladies and gentlemen, I would say one word and it is this that this Province of yours had to undergo a lot of suffering and trouble, but it was ultimately saved by the Grace

Essential qualities of a regiment (15th Apr 1948)

Address at the Presentation of Colours to the 2/15th Punjab Machine Gun Regiment, Peshawar, on I5th April, 1948. This occasion, which has afforded me opportunity of presenting colours to your Regiment, is an honour of which I need hardly say that I feel very proud. The qualities that are required for the making of a Regiment like yours of a very high order such as an unbounded sense of discipline, loyalty, and selfless devotion to duty and physical endurance. A man cannot at all times be thinking of great qualities; –and indeed he would be a poor sort of man if he were to lose himself in an analysis of qualities–but let me tell you in a nutshell, they are all embodied in one simple phrase–loyalty to your Regiment–and your colours are a symbol and a reminder of what your Regiment stands for just as you stand for your nation. It is not for me to praise your records in the battles that you have fought: that is a matter of history and facts. But I may venture to say that I have learnt o

The Frontier policy of Pakistan (14 Apr 1948)

Address to the Tribal Jirga at Government House, Peshawar on 17th April, 1948. I have been looking forward since long to meet you, representatives of the Tribes of the North-West Frontier, and it has given me very great pleasure indeed to have met you here today. I am sorry I have not been able to visit you in your own part of the country, but I hope to be able to do so sometime in the future. I thank you for you’re welcome to me and for the kind personal references you have made about me. Whatever I have done, I did as a servant of Islam, and only tried to perform my duty and made every possible contribution within my power to help our nation. It has been my constant endeavour to try to bring about unity among Mussalmans, and I hope that in the great task of reconstruction and building up Great and Glorious Pakistan, that is ahead of us, you realize that solidarity is now more essential than it ever was for achieving Pakistan, which by the Grace of God we have already done. I am

Administration must be impartial -Advice to Govt. servants (14th Apr 1948)

Informal talk to Civil Officers at Government House, Peshawar on 14th April, 1948. The reason why I wanted to meet you is that I wanted to say a few words to you, who are occupying very important position in the administration of Pakistan in this Province. The first thing that I want to tell you is this, that you should not be influenced by any political pressure, by any political party or individual politician. If you want to raise the prestige and greatness of Pakistan, you must not fall a victim to any pressure, but do your duty as servants to the people and the State, fearlessly and honestly. Service is the backbone of the State. Governments are formed, Government is defeated, Prime Ministers come and go, Ministers come and go, but you stay on, and, therefore, there is a very great responsibility placed on your shoulders. You should have no hand in supporting this political party or that political leader–this is not your business. Whichever Government is formed according to the

Strong Air Force - A shield against aggression (13th Apr 1948)

Speech to the Royal Pakistan Air Force Station Risalpur on 13th April, 1948. It gives me great pleasure to pay my first visit to a unit of the Royal Pakistan Air Force. There is no doubt that any country without a strong Air Force is at the mercy of any aggressor. Pakistan must build up her Air Force as quickly as possible. It must be an efficient Air Force second to none and must take its right place with the Army and the Navy in securing Pakistan’s defence. I am well aware of air developments in other countries and my Government is determined that the Royal Pakistan Air Force will not lee behind. The Royal Pakistan Air Force has started with very few assets, except loyalty and determination, to succeed. But the Royal Pakistan Air Force is already taking shape; this school formed only 7 months ago is a worthy example of this. I know also that you are short of aircraft and equipment, but efforts are being made to procure the necessary equipment and orders for modern aircraft h

Importance of physical culture (12th Apr 1948)

Message to the First Olympic Games on 12th April 1948. For sound minds we should have sound bodies and that is why nations the world over attach so much importance to boy-building and physical culture. The first Pakistan Olympic Games should act as an incentive to all Pakistan nationals to emulate the Olympic Motto “Citius, Althius, Fortiusn” i.e. “Faster, Higher and stronger” I wish the organizers of the games and all competitors the best of luck. Build up Pakistan higher, firmer and stronger. Pakistan Zindabad

M.A. Jinnah Quotes

We are starting with this fundamental principle that we are all citizens and equal citizens of one State. ( Presidential Address to the Constituent Assembly of Pakistan on 11th August, 1947 . ) The constitution of Pakistan has yet to be framed by the Pakistan Constituent Assembly. I do not know what the ultimate shape of this constitution is going to be, but I am sure that it will be of a democratic type, embodying the essential principle of Islam. Today, they are as applicable in actual life as they were 1,300 years ago. Islam and its idealism have taught us democracy. It has taught equality of man, justice and fairplay to everybody. We are the inheritors of these glorious traditions and are fully alive to our responsibilities and obligations as framers of the future constitution of Pakistan. In any case Pakistan is not going to be a theocratic State to be ruled by priests with a divine mission. We have many non-Muslims --Hindus, Christians, and Parsis --but they are all Pakistanis