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Showing posts with the label MINORITIES

Replying To Various Points Raised By The Deputation Of The Scheduled Cast Federation Dacca, March 21, 1948

The Quaid said: "We stand by our declarations that members of every community will be treated as citizens of Pakistan with equal rights and privileges and obligations and that the minorities will be safeguarded and protected". He added: “But you must have a little patience and give us time to make the effort to give effect to those declarations. I assure you of our goodwill and solicitude for the welfare of the Scheduled Castes in particular, as you have been downtrodden for countries, deserve more help than any other community. I have always advocated your cause and I shall continue to do so.” In regard to their proposal that two Scheduled Caste Ministers should be included in the East Bengal Ministry, the Quaid-i-Azam said: “It is not that we are against including the Scheduled Castes in the Ministry, but the present position of the Schedule Castes in the Assembly is that you have only five members who follow you out of 19. We are after all working on the lines of dem

Statement On Protection For Minorities In Pakistan

Quaid-e-Azam with the representatives of Minorities Quaid-i-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah, Governor General designate of Pakistan, at a press conference, assured the minorities in the Pakistan Dominion that they would have protection with regard to their religion, faith, life, property and culture. They would, in all respects be citizens of Pakistan without any discrimination and no doubt along with it they would have the obligations of citizenship. The minorities would have to be loyal to the State and owe true allegiance to the State. The same principle, the Quaid emphasized, would apply to the minorities in India as well. One cannot have minorities disloyal to the State and sabotaging the state. Every citizen must be loyal to his State. Citizens of Pakistan Question : Could you as Governor General make a brief statement on the minorities problems? The Quaid: At present I am only Governor-General designate. We will assume for moment that on August 15, I shall be really the Gov

Statement Regarding Killing In The Minority Province New Delhi: Nov 3, 1946

Quaid-i-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah, President of the All India Muslim League has issued the following statement to the press: “I have been receiving reports of very grave and serious character of killing and destruction of property from the Muslim minority provinces such as Bihar, U.P., C.P., Madras and Bombay and I assure the Muslims of minority provinces that it was not due to indifferent or neglect that I have been queit. The matter is receiving my most careful attention and consideration. Enquiries by the League “It was arranged that four members of the Interior Central Government should go to Patna. Besides Mr. Muhammad Nauman, M.L.A. (Central) has been deputed by the Muslim League Party in the Central Assembly to go to Bihar and enquiries are being made with regard to those parts of U.P., C.P., Bihar, Madras and Bombay where disturbances have taken place, including East Bengal and Calcutta. “I shall await the reports of our representatives Mr. Liaquat Ali Khan and Sardar Ab

Quaid-e-Azam with representatives of minorities

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Quaid-e-Azam Mohammad Ali Jinnah and Fundamental Human Rights

By Sharifuddin Pirzada Quaid-e-Azam always believed in and stood for human rights. In pre-Partition period he championed the cause of liberty, freedom of speech and association and other rights. In the Eighteenth Annual Session of the Muslim League held at Delhi in December 1926, Quaid-e-Azam proposed a resolution demanding that the Government of India Act 1919 should be revised and that without delay a Royal Commission be appointed to formulate a scheme so as to place Indian Constitution on a sound and permanent basis with provisions to establish full responsible Government in India.The resolution further demanded that any scheme of the future of Constitution of India should secure and guarantee, among others, the following basic and fundamental principles. "Full religious liberty i.e. liberty of belief, worship, observances, propaganda, association and education shall be guaranteed to all communities." In the famous Fourteen Points formulated by the Quaid-e-Azam on M

Q & A session: Quaid-e-Azam's Press Conference, Delhi (July 14th, 1947)

. Quaid-e-Azam Mohammad Ali Jinnah had a press conference July 14th (1947) in Delhi, following is Q & A session. Q. Could you as governor-general make a brief statement on the minorities problem? A. At present I am only governor-general designate. We will assume for a moment that on August 15 I shall be really the governor-general of Pakistan. On that assumption, let me tell you that I shall not depart from what I said repeatedly with regard to the minorities. Every time I spoke about the minorities I meant what I said and what I said I meant. Minorities to whichever community they may belong will be safeguarded. Their religion or faith or belief will be secure. There will be no interference of any kind with their freedom of worship. They will have their protection with regard to their religion, faith, their life, their culture. They will be, in all respects, the citizens of Pakistan without any distinction of caste or creed. The will have their rights and privileges and no do

Quaid-e-Azam with the Minorities

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Quaid-e-Azam M.A. Jinnah: A Guardian of Minorities

  Quaid-e-Azam Mohammad Ali Jinnah with representatives of minorities The role of Quaid-i-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah in the annals of Indo-Pakistan has variously been interpreted implying a variety of perspectives which have earned him a good deal of prestigious titles like the Ambassador of Hindu-Muslim unity, as a strategist, etc. A survey of literature, however, reveals that Jinnah’s vision regarding minority rights and his struggle and strategies to safeguard their interests perhaps is the most ignored perspective. Jinnah’s vision about minority’s place in the institutional frame of the Imperial Government in British India and later in the Sovereign State of Pakistan rather becomes more important in the context of growing discontent among religious minorities of Pakistan. 1 This situation has earned a scientific inquiry of Jinnah’s vision in this regard since his whole political career seems to be a struggle for minority rights, especially the Muslims. The Muslim community in th

Four Stages of Jinnah’s Political Philosophy

By Prof. Dr. S. K. Alqama For many decades now, Quaid-i-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah’s vision of Pakistan has been a point of contention, yet also a great source of inspiration. A careful examination of his long distinguished public service, spanning some 44 years (1904-48), can aid in defining how he perceived the future of Pakistan. The Quaid’s political philosophy evolved in four distinct yet continuous stages. In the first stage of his public life (1904-20), his political credo was influenced by three main factors: 19th century British liberalism, first encountered during his legal studies in England from 1892 to 1896; the metropolitan flavour and mercantile milieu of Mumbai where he worked as a successful and respected member of the legal community; his close professional and personal contact with the Parsis, who taught him how a small religious group could - with the help of an entrepreneurial spirit, hard work and social cohesion - defeat racial prejudice and communal di

Quaid-e-Azam listening to Law Minister Joginder Nath Mandal

Equal treatment to all - Assurance to minorities ( 3rd Feb 1948)

Speech in reply to Address of Welcome presented to Quaid-e-Azam and Miss Fatima Jinnah by the Parsi community of Sind at the Katrak Parsi Colony, Karachi: February 3, 1948. I am thankful to you for your Address of Welcome and the kind words you have spoken about me and Miss Fatima Jinnah. I deeply appreciate your offer of loyal co-operation with the Government of Pakistan and I assure you that Pakistan means to stand by its oft-repeated promises of according equal treatment to all its nationals irrespective of their cast and creed. Pakistan, which symbolizes the aspirations of a nation that found itself in a minority in the Indian sub-continent, can not be unmindful of the minorities within its own borders. It is a pity that the fair name of Karachi was sullied by the sudden outburst of communal frenzy last month and I can not find words strong enough to condemn the action of those who were responsible for it. Government is determined in its resolve to root out lawlessness and to see

Protection of minorities: A sacred undertaking (30th Oct 1947)

Broadcast Speech from the Pakistan Radio, Lahore on 30th October, 1947 A few days ago, I received harrowing accounts of the terrible happenings in the Punjab and the situation, from all accounts, appeared to be so grave that I decided to come to Lahore. On my arrival here, I immediately got in touch with various sources that were available to me and I was deeply grieved to realize that unfortunately, there was a great deal of truth in what had been told to me. I am speaking to you under deep distress and with a heavy heart. We have, undoubtedly, achieved Pakistan and that too without bloody war and practically peacefully by moral and intellectual force and with the power of pen which is no less mighty than the sword and so our righteous cause has triumphed. Are we now going to besmear and tarnish this greatest achievement for which there is not parallel in the whole history of the world by resorting to frenzy, savagery and butchery? And, will this lead us anywhere? Pakistan is now a